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just-another-book-lover:

Some terry pratchett quotes.

(via thedreadvampy)

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iguanamouth:

deep sea mermaids

(via orlofsky)

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crazyqueerclassicist:

callmeraven13:

chaoticfangurl:

birdworlds:

Owning a Raven is a lot of work, in America African Ravens & crows are legal to own. I’ve interacted with companion ravens before and they are fantastic. Seeing this incredible bird free flying and playing in the air while knowing he is keeping his eye on us and will come back.

I MUST ASK YOU QUESTIONS… RATHER ODDLY SPECIFC QUESTIONS.

rAVENS ON MY DASHBOARD?

YES

"Rather oddly specific questions"

#Have you taught it to say “nevermore”

(via seananmcguire)

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theonlycheeseleft:


There is not nearly enough work about Bossuet and Courfeyrac being the Law Bros that they are. Pilf and I have attempted to fix that.
Art by PilferingApples. Fic by TheOnlyCheeseLeft.
Title: A Story In Nearly Everything
Characters: Courfeyrac, Bossuet
Summary: "You may call me whatever you wish, as long as you continue to call me friend."

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theonlycheeseleft:

There is not nearly enough work about Bossuet and Courfeyrac being the Law Bros that they are. Pilf and I have attempted to fix that.

Art by PilferingApples. Fic by TheOnlyCheeseLeft.

Title: A Story In Nearly Everything

Characters: Courfeyrac, Bossuet

Summary: "You may call me whatever you wish, as long as you continue to call me friend."

Read More

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alex-does-mad-science a dit: So, me and some friends went and saw the Hobbit and THE SCENES WITH LAURIEL MADE ME SO ANGRY. I understand wanting to introduce female characters, but they've set it up so that all she is is a romantic subplot tool and it's so frustrating! Also, so much bloat. They could have done this in two instead of three movies. Too much mountain.

nemertea:

Look, I’ll be the first person to admit that Tolkien could maybe use some more ladies in his books, and that I’m not entirely happy with the way he writes ladies.  But I’m even more upset with Peter Jackson, who included exactly three novel female characters, one of whom was an elf, and two of whom were children whose only role was to scream a lot.

For one thing, there are thirteen fucking perfectly good dwarves that could have been genderbent to good effect — last time I checked, for example “Ori” and “Oin” were pretty gender neutral names (And, oh man, if Gloin had been cast female, I would have literally jumped up and down in delight for so many reasons). This would have allowed Peter Jackson to create meaningful female characters who contributed materially to the quest without introducing long, bloated subplots to the film that MADE NO SENSE. It also would have allowed us to get away from bearded dwarf ladies as a JOKE and see them as actual, real people.

But, okay, if he wanted his lady character to belong to the race that he has decided will be portrayed by slender, conventionally attractive white people … fine. It’s not an unproblematic decision, but once you make it, you do have the responsibility to treat her as a person with her own emotional agency, and that’s my biggest problem with her romantic subplots; her own opinions aren’t actually all that important. Thranduil yells at her because he says that Legolas has a crush, but her behavior doesn’t indicate that this is anything but one-sided. Similarly, Kili’s declaration comes to her when she is his doctor and he is a patient, hardly the circumstances under which she could actually make a true emotional declaration (especially since, conveniently, her patient doesn’t even think she’s REAL, so nothing they say really counts as an emotional truth anyway). I don’t object to female characters being involved in romantic plots (and I do actually LIKE that Kili, rather than Tauriel, is the damsel in distress), but I do object to female characters being the object of romantic plots without being given the agency to determine their own fate within them.

I also think that a Romeo and Juliet plot to reconcile Dwarves and Elves, if it’s used here (and it looks like it’s going to be, since we know that Kili will die, and I think it very likely that Tauriel will too), immeasurably cheapens the relationships of Gimli with Galadriel and Legolas, because it means that reconciliation does not come about through the elves explicit admission that the culture and way of life of the Dwarves has inherent value (Galadriel’s role), and it makes Legolas into a petulant child nursing a grudge over the death of a loved one rather that someone who makes a conscious! difficult decision to overcome his own prejudices.

And, to be perfectly fair, if you do see Legolas and Gimli as a romantic couple (and I think this is a very valid interpretation of the two, even though Tolkien would have considered it … non-canonical, at best), I think that their romance is, as a queer romance between two people who, neither of them, really fall into normalized ideals of masculinity, a more interesting, more desperately needed romance, than a straight romance between two conventionally super attractive people, whose only objection to being together lies in a FICTIONAL difference in race. And having two ridiculous queer boys reunite their peoples through the power of grouchy beards and walks in the woods is, I think, more powerful than having two super attractive people do it through conventional romance.

I’m also really bothered by all of the little ways in which Peter Jackson showed that, sure, Tauriel might be badass and rebellious and all that, but she’s still not as good of a fighter as Legolas.

(Oh, and that thing she says about fighting evil and being part of this world. Is not, to my mind, a thing an Elf would say. And also I’m not sure that she should glow.)

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hatteress:

lillaniebug:

hatteress:

markme2u:

lovelikecodeine:

officerlollipop:

foggyzombie:

iamdonemaybe:

damnlayofftheguilt:

bluevelvetdarkandstars:

fortifiedsmiles:

Holy.

Fucking.

Shit.

RESPECT

Pole dancers are actually super freakishly strong.

i can’t even do a pull up

Such a pity it’s so hyper sexualised. These women are badasses.

reasons why i want to pole dance.

I want to learn how to pole dance 😊😏

I also think it’s a pity it has basically become synonymous with strippers and promiscuity. It takes some ridiculous arm and core strength (as you can picture above) and should be more closely linked with exercise or fitness.

become? BECOME?!

Dude, I hate to be a third grader about this but strippers did it first.

Those badass moves up there? They were developed by strippers, in an adult entertainment environment. Just because the art form has been adopted by the fitness industry does not give you the fucking right to erase it’s origins.

As to your pity. I pity people who feel the need to boo-hiss sexualised things just because they’re sexualised. Sexualised =/= bad. You want to pity something - pity the fucking society that teaches us the bullshit puritanical drivel you’re spitting.

Pity the society that ensures that the thousands of women that self-learn amazing feats of strength and dexterity like those you see above, are automatically equated zero respect for their achievements simply because they deigned to learn them in a sexualised environment.

Pity the fucking society that has contributed to your backwards fucking assumption that stripping can be equated to promiscuity (spoiler alert: YOU’RE FUCKING WRONG).

Pity the society and then help us fucking CHANGE IT by pulling your head out of your fucking ass and ceasing to perpetuate damaging, disgusting falsehoods.

So, just wanna jump in here.

Pole started in India and Japan and was more aerial and gymnastic tricks.

In the 20’s women started dancing and whatnot on the poles in circus tents.

It wasn’t until they moved from the tents to the bars that pole became sexualized.

Lots of pole fitness moves are indeed adaptations from those used in bars/clubs, but many (most of the advanced moved) are from something else entirely.

Personally, I think that the gymnastic aspect comes from it’s origins but the fluidity comes from the sexualization.

Oh man, I was gonna wash my hands of this post but I just-

You are correct when you say that India developed a pole sport before any known record of exotic pole dancing. The form was called Pole Mallakhamb and it was developed as a training exercise for wrestlers.

Fixed Mallakhamb (the one involving a static pole) is performed on a wooden pole with a circumference of 55cm at the base that gradually tapers to a 35cm circumference at the top.

image

(credit)

Now Chinese pole (not Japanese fyi) has a bit more in common with westernised pole dancing, if only for the make and set up of the pole itself.

image

(credit)

It was developed in a circus environment and is performed on a (usually) wooden pole, though sometimes the pole is coated in rubber to improve grip. A few professional pole fitness moves have been adopted from the form, including the flag which, as moves go, is fucking badass and requires some serious core strength.

Now, to say that the pole dancing form adopted by the fitness industry has more in common with either of these techniques than exotic pole dancing is not only ludicrous, it’s fucking insulting.

You are literally removing credit for the natural development of pole tricks within the sex industry from exotic dancers and giving it to male-dominated sports.

"Most of the advanced moves" did not come from Chinese pole or fixed Mallakhamb. They came from women fucking around on a pole while the club wound down around them at 3am in the morning. They came from women wanting to challenge themselves and each other; from fun and determination and comradery.

How do I know this? Because I was fucking there.

I was there when a fellow dancer dared me to twist a different way out of a hang just to see if I could. I was there when I pulled the move off and I was there when three other girls and I spent an hour trying to figure out how to make this “new” move work in a stage routine. D’you know what that move was?

This thing:

image

(credit)

I later found out it was called the superman. We didn’t know at the time y’see - pole dancing for fitness was only just finding it’s feet in my city and no one had really bothered naming any of the moves we were doing at the club when we could just swing up and show anyone who asked.

So, sorry, but no. The “gymnastic aspect” of contemporary pole dancing cannot be divorced from it’s sexualised roots just because people feel more comfy attributing the “legitimate” aspects of the sport to ancient, male-dominated pole forms.

GTFO of here with this bullshit please.

Also you know what?

I’m not good enough to do any of the advanced moves yet, but from what I have done - it is so much easier and more fun if you don’t try and pretend it’s not a sexualized thing. Yes, even if you’re doing it purely for fitness.

Because at some point you will realize that you are in your underwear humping a pole and the only way to make that not awkward is if everyone in the room can just admit that it’s sexualized and laugh about it. If you try and pretend there’s nothing sexual there it feels so much more awkward and guiltier to do that than if you just admit; yes, I am in my underwear humping a pole.

and it’s really fucking fun.

(Source : imanoreocomeeatme, via notanearlyadopter)

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needsmoreresearch:

"Well, Bossuet doesn’t mind it. Does he.”

Bossuet, prodded, poked his nose over the top of his book and shrugged. “I do not. As long as you drape something tidily over it. There are generally at least four legs in this room and very often six or more, so why should I…

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james-p-sullivan:

HEY TUMBLR

DID YOU GUYS KNOW JENGA MADE A NEW VERSION OF THEIR GAME, BUT INSTEAD OF STRAIGHT BORING WOODEN ONES, ITS TETRIS PIECES

THATS RIGHT, ITS MOTHER FUCKING TETRIS JENGA

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THE TWO OF THE MOST STRESSFUL GOD DAMNED GAMES WE PLAYED AS CHILDREN ROLLED INTO ONE

(via scoobyben)

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edwarddespard:

Lot of Jehan feels on my dash these days, which is all good – he’s such an intriguing character, with so much suggestive material included in what Hugo says about him. I’ve written before about what I see as the possible interpretations of the description of his dress and why I personally go with the idea of him as exemplifying the Romantics of the time who adopted eccentric attire…the illustration above is for AMarguerite’s lovely My Object All Sublime. I’ve also mentioned before why I think the poet and author Gérard de Nerval, rather than the more commonly proposed sculptor Jehan Du Seigneur, is a significant influence on the development of the character.
Another interesting aspect of his character that has recently been discussed is the apparently incongruous idea of such a gentle character being involved in a violent upheaval – and clearly, by 1832, Jehan would have known that bloodshed was a near inevitability for the Republican cause (even aside from the 1830 Revolution there were violent street clashes most years around this period, including the summer of 1831). A significant clue is in his reading: we are told he reads Dante, Juvenal, Aeschylus, and Isaiah and in French “he preferred Corneille to Racine, and Agrippa d’Aubigné to Corneille.” Most would be familiar with the poets (and with the content of Isaiah), but D’Aubigne is worth exploring. Théodore-Agrippa d’Aubigné’s epic poem, Les Tragiques, is apocalyptic in nature – the Huguenot author essential writing about a violent destruction of what he saw as Catholic oppression. In other words, not the reading matter one would expect of a shy, gentle, retiring poet – at least on the surface. But the Romantic era poets, authors and artists were very much concerned with apocalyptic visionaries, and in this respect Prouvaire fits into the artistic zeitgeist of his era. What is intriguing is that he also progressed his artistic vision into the political sphere, and embraced the idea of revolution. I’d suggest that Prouvaire sees a correlation between the artistic and political revolutions of the era, and he embraces the idea that the necessary upheaval might be violent in more than one sense. 
I believe it is significant that, at the barricades, when Enjolras is called upon to commit a violent act in the execution of Le Cabuc, it is Combeferre and Prouvaire whose response is described: 
“Jean Prouvaire and Combeferre pressed each other’s hands silently, and, leaning against each other in an angle of the barricade, they watched with an admiration in which there was some compassion, that grave young man, executioner and priest, composed of light, like crystal, and also of rock.”
Prouvaire, I suspect, profoundly understands Enjolras – he is, after all, the man who reads Isaiah and would comprehend the “fearsome cherubim of Ezekiel.” Enjolras already has the look of one who has transversed the revolutionary apocalypse, and this is a concept Jehan embraces. 
It is no wonder that Prouvaire was so dear to Enjolras that, when called upon to do so, Enjolras did not hesitate to compromise his republican ideals to attempt to save his friend’s life.

edwarddespard:

Lot of Jehan feels on my dash these days, which is all good – he’s such an intriguing character, with so much suggestive material included in what Hugo says about him. I’ve written before about what I see as the possible interpretations of the description of his dress and why I personally go with the idea of him as exemplifying the Romantics of the time who adopted eccentric attire…the illustration above is for AMarguerite’s lovely My Object All Sublime. I’ve also mentioned before why I think the poet and author Gérard de Nerval, rather than the more commonly proposed sculptor Jehan Du Seigneur, is a significant influence on the development of the character.

Another interesting aspect of his character that has recently been discussed is the apparently incongruous idea of such a gentle character being involved in a violent upheaval – and clearly, by 1832, Jehan would have known that bloodshed was a near inevitability for the Republican cause (even aside from the 1830 Revolution there were violent street clashes most years around this period, including the summer of 1831). A significant clue is in his reading: we are told he reads Dante, Juvenal, Aeschylus, and Isaiah and in French “he preferred Corneille to Racine, and Agrippa d’Aubigné to Corneille.” Most would be familiar with the poets (and with the content of Isaiah), but D’Aubigne is worth exploring. Théodore-Agrippa d’Aubigné’s epic poem, Les Tragiques, is apocalyptic in nature – the Huguenot author essential writing about a violent destruction of what he saw as Catholic oppression. In other words, not the reading matter one would expect of a shy, gentle, retiring poet – at least on the surface. But the Romantic era poets, authors and artists were very much concerned with apocalyptic visionaries, and in this respect Prouvaire fits into the artistic zeitgeist of his era. What is intriguing is that he also progressed his artistic vision into the political sphere, and embraced the idea of revolution. I’d suggest that Prouvaire sees a correlation between the artistic and political revolutions of the era, and he embraces the idea that the necessary upheaval might be violent in more than one sense.

I believe it is significant that, at the barricades, when Enjolras is called upon to commit a violent act in the execution of Le Cabuc, it is Combeferre and Prouvaire whose response is described:

Jean Prouvaire and Combeferre pressed each other’s hands silently, and, leaning against each other in an angle of the barricade, they watched with an admiration in which there was some compassion, that grave young man, executioner and priest, composed of light, like crystal, and also of rock.”

Prouvaire, I suspect, profoundly understands Enjolras – he is, after all, the man who reads Isaiah and would comprehend the “fearsome cherubim of Ezekiel.” Enjolras already has the look of one who has transversed the revolutionary apocalypse, and this is a concept Jehan embraces.

It is no wonder that Prouvaire was so dear to Enjolras that, when called upon to do so, Enjolras did not hesitate to compromise his republican ideals to attempt to save his friend’s life.

(via pilgrim--soul)

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I don’t know who to blame for this

cinaed:

(So I’m just going to blame everyone. EVERYONE. Just going to go off and cry about Antoine-Jean Gros, Georges Pontmercy, and Mabeuf….)

—-

50-Year-Old Mystery Over the Identity of the Soldier in "A Farewell at Elba" Solved

A recently uncovered letter by British captain John Aubrey solves one part of the Gros mystery that has puzzled art historians for over half a century.

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